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Why Virat Kohli and AB de Villiers should not play in the same team

by Naked Cricket

When AB does those things, like plucking white balls, one-handed out of thin air, the world goes nuts. And that silly smile sits on Virat’s face – there is contentment. His world is at peace. He may even have attained nirvana at that precise moment. He’s sitting in the RCB dugout but for all you know, he could be in McLeodganj with the Dalai Lama.
Often Virat is in the middle, and he can speak to his buddy after yet another of AB’s Do-Not-Try-This-At Home feats. The glow on Virat’s face is nothing short of a girl marrying her bearded Prince charming.
At no point has Virat tried to hide his fanboy awe of AB. Why would he? How could he? How could anyone? The very reason you pick AB de Villiers in your team is for such superhuman feats.  
It’s another thing that such superhuman feats will always have a downside – they will make everyone around, including Virat, far less. There’s no way you can match AB, so why not just roll over and die? Or do nothing. He’ll take care of it. He’s a superhuman after all.
And while AB can string together some fantastic strokes and catches, he is but a foot-soldier in the team. He is not RCB’s captain, Virat is.
Virat, in his own way, can be quite a superhuman. But by now, don’t we know that in the superhero hierarchy, there is the super superhero, and his flunky? While AB was being referred to as Superman and Spiderman (the latter by Virat too), India’s cricketing superhero was enjoying way too much shade.
There isn’t much between Virat and AB in terms of runs this IPL – while the captain played all 14 league matches (530 runs, averaging 48.18, striking at 139.10), the Superman was unwell for two (480 runs, averaging 53.33, striking at 174.54). While the difference in strike rates is 35+, Virat’s strike rate was still way above par.
While both Virat and AB had an indifferent 2017 season, they both were in supreme form in 2016 where they lost to Sunrisers Hyderabad in the finals.
A final in which current SRH skipper, Kane Williamson did not feature. He played six of SRH’s 17 matches that season. The then captain, David Warner, played all matches, leading SRH to the IPL trophy.
In 2017, Williamson played seven matches but upped his strike rate from 101 to 151, his batting average too more than doubled from 20.66 to 42.66. Warner, though, was in another zone (combining the best of Kohli and de Villiers) - scoring 848 runs at a strike rate of 151.42, at an average of 60.57 in 2016; averaging 58.27, striking at 141 in 2017.
Williamson, though, had moved in from the sidelines. This season when Warner was unavailable, Williamson led SRH to the play-offs as table toppers. 661 runs, average of 60 at a strike rate of 143.
Forget the numbers for a moment, and stand the four cricketers alongside each other. What do you see? Warner captain, Williamson vice-captain? AB superman, and Virat?
While Virat’s role has always been similar to that of Warner’s, to bat high up (if not open) and go on to bat through the innings with varying degrees of acceleration; it is AB’s brilliance that has been a distraction – not just for the captain but for the team on a whole.
In the shade of AB’s brilliance, RCB has underachieved yet again under Virat’s captaincy. It may sound downright preposterous but for RCB to come together as a team, they may have to split the most beautiful pairing in the IPL.
Virat may make a far better captain when he is trying to dismiss AB with the ball. The awe will be intact, (as it no doubt was in the last Test series) but there will be a far greater focus – a competition between the two, which can only happen when the two play against each other. As team mates, Virat almost seems to shudder from the limelight. And that is pretty much going against the grain.
Of course, there are other ways to do it too, go about the auctions smartly but that’s asking too much of royally challenged Bangalore.

First published here

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Is Virat Kohli ready to rev up RCB?

by Naked Cricket

The year 2016 was Virat Kohli's best IPL season by a long shot. He scored the first and last of his four IPL 100s that year. His strike rate at 152 was his highest ever. That year, Virat Kohli opened the batting with KL Rahul. Like some wild cats, openers too hunt in pairs. This season, Royal Challengers Bangalore (RCB) gave KL Rahul the miss, and Kohli mostly gave opening the batting a miss.
Whatever goes on to happen in RCB's last two league matches, at five wins and seven losses, this has been far from a champion side. Out of these five wins, two have been against bottom placed Delhi Daredevils and another two against a weak Kings XI Punjab (KXIP), way too reliant on its openers. Three of these five wins have been of the blade of AB de Villiers.
RCB's other win was against Mumbai Indians which was on a losing spree.
While Kohli has opened the batting thrice out of 12 innings, he's largely batted at three, occasionally at four. Twice he opened with Quinton de Kock, and once the other day with Parthiv Patel, hunting down Punjab's two fat ladies, 88. He scored 48(28) that day. 92*(62) against Mumbai Indians' 213, where he was the only RCB batsman to go past 20. And while his score looks flash on paper, it was largely an innings of Net Run Rate damage-control, wherein he batted out the innings with wickets falling around him - he accelerated at the end, upping his strike rate and shrinking the margin of defeat. It was Kohli in auto-pilot mode. In many ways, like a perceptive Dhoni innings.
In between, he opened against CSK, ending with 18(15). There's no pattern to when Kohli opens, but on all three occasions, de Villiers (who missed a few matches) had been in the playing XI. Twice RCB had been chasing, once a 200-plus total, once a score below 100 - RCB's fourth, sixth and twelfth games.
Going into their thirteenth game, neither RCB nor Kohli still know what their best playing XI is - as with losing teams, their playing XI has been tossed around. Only now, Kohli, de Villiers, Umesh Yadav and Yuzvendra Chahal are sure shot starters but don't bet on that either.
Consumed by this uncertainty, Kohli has hedged his bets too - between coming at his customary three or even four, and only opening on the odd occasion. Opening the batting takes upon one of two roles:
1) Fearless T20 offensive
2) Coasting T20 offensive
While even a passive Kohli can coast at a steady strike rate of 120-plus, it's the destructive Kohli (s/r of 150-plus) that has taken a break. Inert openers, such as Gambhir and Rahane have relinquished their spot.
Whereas those such as KL Rahul, Chris Gayle, Shane Watson and Jos Buttler have defined results.
Both Watson and Gayle have centuries, whereas KL Rahul has struck 558 runs at a strike rate of 162. His highest of 95*(70), wasn't too dissimilar to that of Kohli's 92* (62) - he was the lone warrior in a lost cause, the only batsman to go past 11.
While Rahul found in Gayle, a fellow bully opener, that plundered opening bowlers, Kohli had an unsure de Kock, preferring to partner a similarly accomplished bat such as de Villiers in the middle overs.
After being lost in the middle overs for half the tournament, Buttler opened the batting in a rain-hit 12 over shoot out. His 67(27) with seven sixes, all but stormed Delhi. However, this set Buttler for a record-breaking five half centuries on the trot - 82, 95*, 94* being his last three successful crusades. Buttler single-handedly beat stronger teams like CSK and MI with his bat. And when he failed to cross 50, in spite of a blistering start, 39(22), his team went down to KKR. But there was never any ambiguity. Buttler striking at 155, for his 548 runs of which 428 were in the last six innings opening.
Meanwhile, a more restrained Kohli has been striking at 142 for his 548 runs. While Kohli has had de Villiers for company, Buttler has largely been lonesome at the top and elsewhere too.
Goes to show that even a weak, somewhat imbalanced team such as Rajasthan can win matches with one Mad Max on the top. It may not always come off but when it does, there's nothing more spectacular than 100-run salute by a marauding bat.
It's over to Virat Kohli. Does he want to hold himself back? Does he want to unleash AB? Does he want to unleash both himself and AB? And if so, then why not on the top?
Surely they've both been watching Buttler bat. And learnt a thing or two about T20 attack in the power play. It's never too late to unlearn the art of restraint in this format. Especially, in your eleventh season.
First published here

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Young master Rishabh Pant, The Avenger or our very own Rish Puttar?

by Naked Cricket

Deep down is a realization that he must rage on – with or without the team.
Imagine for a moment that the Delhi Daredevils are the Delhi Defeatist Duds. OK, you don't have to imagine. They are. Defeat is part of their DNA. Oh, another D. Defeat, a way of life. Defeat that negates victory, and slays it if and when it hints at turning the tide. That each player, on signing up for the Duds, and being handed his cap, has the team's defeatist past instilled in his very being. "We've lost it," is the team motto.
Sounds dreadful? Not really. If and when hope may emerge, a key player will snuff it out. For argument's sake, let's call him Despair. Such players are always lurking, and handpicked for huge sums for a glorious cricketing past that is but a vague memory.
Despair will play so many games that the overall mood in the camp will be so gloomy that each player will start believing, "We've lost it". This will include players on the bench that are yet to play a match. Challengers of the Duds, who are part of the team, and show promise to turn defeat into something as hopeful as victory, are swiftly removed - either by non-selection, injury, personal matters or even conflict of interest - conflict being victory and defeat. They are rarely retained for the next season.
Midst of all this, there is a kid. A kid, because he's not really a boy, not quite a man. He's there. He got in through the DD cracks. He exists within the cracks. He goes unseen by the Dud police, he's invisible to their radars.
He is Rishabh Pant. The commentators still call him a teenager. Still others refer to him as "The boy who lived" or simply Rish Puttar (Punjabi for kid) or even Harry Potter. Rarely has a player survived the utter and complete despair of the Defeatist Duds - but here, he's even challenged and surmounted it.
There are jokes within rare light moments in DD circles that even though he wears the team shirt it is he who wears the Pant(s) in the team. Whatever. Such mirth is short-lived. A heap of wickets corrects any misplaced positivity. And then there is that other thing, every now and then, Rishabh wears a cap of a colour unlike that of his mates - it's called the Orange cap. There's nothing the Duds can do about it - as the League Dudes have placed it on his head.
There are other ways Rishabh doesn't confirm. He scores runs. Many, many runs. More than anyone kind of runs. That's what got him the orange cap. While the senior most batsman, who is called Max, but really should be called Min, scores very little runs - he is the core of the DD ethos, "Failure at all costs". He's always lurking.
On some days, such as when DD played the table toppers, SRH, in their own Dudyard, there was some misplaced hope. But before it could rub off from the DJ to the players, a few quick wickets went down. The third one, a run out, of the young captain, could have consumed Rishabh Pant. Which is when a Patel joined a Pant - and not Max or Min or whatever you want to call him. Maybe like Pant, Patel too came through a crack.
Out of syllabus as they joke on Twitter.
Rishabh himself is out of syllabus. He thrives on uncertainty like a superhero to an end-of-days reminder. Together, Pant and Patel, went their merry ways before the latter met with another dud of a dismissal - another run out.
Rishabh Pant went green, went Hulk, went nuts with anger. He was in Dudland but it didn't matter. Catharsis. Rish was a volcano, his bat meeting ball was an eruption of Hawaiian volcanic fury. The purge was on. You couldn't leave, fiery lava balls were flying every which way, over your head, into the dusty skies of Dudland.
It was spectacular, as often decimation this complete is. Rish's cannonball run took in its wake the best - first Rashid, then Bhuvi. Alongside Rish was Max (or Min) and in the kid on the other side, he saw a blurred glimpse of his glory days. And he hugged him as if he hugged his past self, as Rish raged on to his hundred.
After the hug, an exit, leaving Rishabh with five balls. What can one do with five balls - 4, 4, 6, 6, 6. Rishabh took Bhuvi for 26 runs, scooping, pulling, one-handed over long on.128* (63), taking DD from nothing to 187/5 off 20 overs. They did not win though. After a quick huddle, the Delhi Defeatist Duds took on the field. And lost without a whimper.
A few days back, the Indian T20 and ODI squad for England and Ireland was announced. Rishabh Pant was not there. Just as he doesn't fit into DD, he doesn't fit into the Indian side.
But there's always a sequel in these fantastic superhero movies, and from the ruin, once again will rise, Rish puttar.
[About Pant's 128*(63): 68.44 per cent of runs by a batsman - Second highest in the IPL ever behind Baz 158 in the first game of the IPL 59 runs off 18 balls in the last four overs from Pant's bat - highest any batsman has made in the last-four in the IPL] via ESPN Cricinfo
However true this may sound, some of this is a work of fiction. Only some though.

First published here

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Why is dropping big names like dropping a big bomb?

by Naked Cricket

The great Yuvraj Singh played seven games for KXIP before he was asked to keep Viru company in the dugout. In these seven games, he dragged his bat to 64 runs at a strike rate of much less than a run a ball – 91.42.
Yuvraj has been many things to Indian cricket, but somehow he’s never quite cut it in the league. But it’s the promise of Yuvraj that has compelled franchises to pay monster-money for him. Once upon a time, just the sight of Yuvi was good enough for the crowds.
On the IPLT20 website, his role is that of an allrounder. In this edition, Yuvraj bowled 12 deliveries in seven matches. For 23 runs. In 2017 too, he bowled 12 deliveries. But in 12 matches.
For a largely faceless team, with no big ticket Indian ODI or T20I stars, Yuvraj gives Punjab a star stamp of authority – he makes it to their ads, plugs, promos; in spite of doing little with the bat, he has that perfect sync with the team. Just watch him celebrate in the dugout, he’s the DJ in the house, the choreographer, the cool, funny dude who everyone gravitates to. He’s in many ways Punjab’s mascot.
When on the field, his fielding has been scratchy, but his enthusiasm has been electric.
Since his absence, KXIP has lost two of its last three matches.
It took six games for Gautam Gambhir to bench himself – 85 runs at strike rate less than a run a ball (96.59) is how it ends for a two-time IPL winning captain.
Years ago, Delhi Daredevils let go of Gambhir at his peak. To make amends, they picked him on the wane. Much like KXIP, Delhi too, lacked an Indian icon. And much like their northern neighbor, their move defied cricketing logic – in only DD’s second match, chasing 71 in six overs against Rajasthan Royals, Gambhir did not come out to bat, even after four wickets. As often before, Gambhir had put the team before himself. Years back at DD, he slipped down to the order, relinquishing the opening spot to David Warner.
If Gambhir’s selection for six matches was tricky, playing Glenn Maxwell for nine matches has been the biggest joke of the IPL. While both Yuvraj and Gambhir have appeared clueless in the middle, Maxwell comes across as a tail-ender trying to reacquaint himself with the blind slog in a long lost match.
It’s mattered little where or when Maxwell bats – the faith in him has been so absolute, and there appears to be a genuine belief that he must play his reckless natural game (for he has no other game) – every innings he appears blindfolded, striking purely by the smell of leather.
Maxwell has somewhat miraculously cobbled together 133 runs in nine matches; his hit-and-miss innings have lasted 87 deliveries, striking at 152.87.
Mumbai Indians’ love affair with Kieron Pollard started in 2010. Since then, he has been a specialist fielder who bats little, and bowls even less. His catches have been the toast of every highlights’ package. Pollard for reasons best known to MI has been one of their most sought-after players.
At times it seems that Pollard plays more matches in a season than even MI. 
What to do, he’s always there. And rarely put under much strain. It’s always too early for Pollard to come out and bat – there’s a belief in MI circles that Pollard can win games of one-two overs but anything more is pushing his T20 powers.
So, coming in this late, it’s tough to ascertain what 76 runs off seven matches means, even if it’s at a strike rate of 108 and an average of 15. But after one defeat too many, MI’s hand was forced and they had to let go of Pollard.
All these indulgences pale in front of D’Arcy Short. In spite of scores of 4, 6, 11 opening the innings, Short got yet another go – 44(43) – helping him fuss long enough to find his touch but also sink his team. He followed that with a cracking 44 and a run a ball 2. Verdict is that RR has a better shot at winning when Short doesn’t score.
While Gambhir and Yuvraj are both pushing 37, and as champions in their time, could well find themselves in the odd mentoring role in future IPLs, don’t be surprised to see Pollard reappear if MI make the playoffs. 
As for D’Arcy Short and Glenn Maxwell, there are enough Aussie commentators on air to tell us of their exploits Down Under. So what if this isn’t the Big Bash League.
Aside: Gambhir and Maxwell are both born on October 14.  
First published here

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While batting, could Dhoni have advised Kohli about the bowling?

by Naked Cricket

At the end of the 9th over, Ravindra Jadeja was dismissed. CSK reeling at 74/4, chasing 205. Dhoni walked out to join Rayudu. The asking rate: 12 runs per over. Doable but across 12 overs that was going to take some doing.
It’s just that Virat Kohli played his cards too soon – Umesh Yadav was bowled out by the 8th over (1/23) and Yuzvendra Chahal was through by the 13th (2/26). That didn’t leave much in the tank for the last seven – of course that depends on what you make of Corey Anderson, Pawan Negi and Mohammad Siraj as your go-to bowlers at the death.
Kohli bowled Washington Sundar for one over – in the power play, the third over. Rayudu hit him for two 6s in that over. Sundar has so far played all six RCB games. Negi, in his second match of the season, dismissed Shane Watson in the first over of the match. He next bowled the 10th over. At 1/17 off two overs, he appeared to be a better bet than Sundar for the 14th over – three 6s and 19 runs later, Negi had gone for 36 off his 3 overs. Neither he nor Sundar bowled again.
Six overs of sameness, of Corey Anderson and Mohammad Siraj’s medium pace followed. Anyone who gives Corey Anderson the 20th over in a chase has been largely absent in the IPL.
Anderson was handed the ball more in hope than anything else. Working backwards from the 20th over, there is no way, any IPL captain, should be asking him to bowl the final over. Rarely has he bowled his full quota in the IPL, often not bowling, and when he does, it’s the odd over or two.
Here, Virat Kohli was entrusting him with four overs, and the icing on the cake for CSK – the 20th over. His T-20 economy rate is 9.07. Could it be a case of an identity crisis – did Kohli think for a moment that this Corey James Anderson was just James Anderson?
The England series and, naturally, Anderson has been on Kohli’s mind.
Meanwhile, Dhoni and Rayudu are fast becoming what Dhoni and Raina were to CSK – there is even a little comic relief with Jadeja’s batting. So far, he’s played all CSK games, sometimes not having to bat, other times not having to bowl, but most times, making us wonder, what he’s doing in the playing XI?
Herein lie some of the answers and Dhoni’s belief – in that word again, process and seeing it through. It’s incorrigible to think that, after so many seasons, Jadeja is a work-in-progress, but it appears so. So far, they’re winning without him. Against RCB, he batted before both Dhoni and Bravo. That after he batted for 12(13) before Bravo’s match-winning 68(30) against Mumbai Indians.
There is no panic, no chopping or changes – Jadeja stays, regardless of whoever else exits. Along with Rayudu, Raina and Bravo, he forms Dhoni’s core group.
So if and when at a later stage, Jadeja pulls off a win with either bat or ball, don’t be too surprised. There’s enough faith in him to do next to nothing, yet retain his spot.
It’s an assumption worth making that at the international level skill sets can be quite similar, and often confidence and form can either take a dip or surge. Is Dhoni waiting for that great, big wave on which Jadeja will surf CSK to a win while all others will drown? Is that what has prompted him to play Imran Tahir in five out of six games so far?
Dhoni, in the middle, had a ringside view of Kohli’s captaincy. Of how he rushed in too early, played all his cards way too soon – and still worse, refused to take a chance with one of his possible trump cards, Washington Sundar – for lack of faith in the off break bowler against two marauding right-handed batsmen?
Instead, six over of medium pace. What would Dhoni have done – was he, as he is for India, behind the stumps – controlling the spinners and the game while Kohli patrols the boundary? 
Daresay there would’ve been more unpredictability. Pace off the ball? Certainly. Chahal held back for at least one over – the 17th or 18th? And Umesh in spite of his profligate ways later on, that one over just in case? If all else failed, either Sundar or even Negi would’ve bowled one more to just break it up.
Doubtful either way, Anderson and Siraj would’ve bowled six on the trot.
There would’ve been far more chill in the middle. That look on Anushka’s face dreading yet another RCB defeat may not have been there either.
The longer Dhoni stayed in the middle, pushing the match into the 20th – the more RCB faces started to look like hers.
They had walked into a trap, one of their own making. They knew. Dhoni knew. Bravo knew. Everybody knew.
16 runs off the last over. That it was over in four was a blessing for RCB. That it ended with a Dhoni six, and Bhajji running in to lift the champion was way too familiar.
At least Kohli had a calming Dhoni hug earlier in the day.
(H/T to @viidyasagar  for his tweet that planted the seed for this article.)

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A non-stop game of snakes and ladders

by Naked Cricket

Even 20 somethings like Rishabh Pant and Sanju Samson know it’s the winning knock that’s remembered – the pace is way too rapid to make allowances for little else.
It’s difficult to say when you connect with a cricketer. Often it may have little to do with his cricket. It could be a name. A stray article that appeals. The way he says, “actually”. It’s not too different with how we connect with people really, how we like some more than others, how that like feeds on its own likeness and becomes something more.
As with Rishabh, it was this U-19 match. He was keeping wickets. He was loud. Loud enough to distract the running between the wickets. Repeatedly. At one time, he suggested they don’t take a single with a “No-No-No-No!” Or was it every time? Rishabh was warned by the umpire. The look on his face, candy taken from a child – “how do you expect me to keep if I can’t shriek?” Rishabh didn’t stay silent for long. He rarely does. Much like his bat.
While Rishabh was retained by his franchise, Delhi Daredevils, being with a losing team has its pitfalls – even a good player will be sucked into the diktat of defeat. Under Rahul Dravid’s mentorship, Rishabh was handed the role of a finisher, often coming in to bat when the match was lost. It was Sanju Samson who batted higher up, scoring his first IPL 100 in 2017. Risbah fell three shy that year, ending up with his highest IPL score, 97.
Rishabh, though, has the fastest T20 century by an Indian - off 32 balls. It’s also the second fastest ever, behind Chris Gayle’s 30 ball ton. But it wasn’t in the IPL. It was against Himachal Pradesh. In the Syed Mushtaq Ali Trophy. His batting partner that day was Gautam Gambhir. Their opening stand was 148 off 11.4 overs. Rishabh ended with 116 off 38 deliveries, Gambhir 30 off 33 deliveries.
Pant made his IPL debut in 2016, Samson in 2013. Both can keep wickets, Pant is 20 and a left-hander, Samson’s 23, and bats right-handed. In the earlier editions, Pant’s strike rate had been much higher, it’s in this IPL that Samson has upped his scoring rate. After five matches, Pant’s numbers are: 223 runs, a highest of 85, an average of 44.60, and a strike rate of 176.78. After six matches, Samson’s numbers: 239 runs, a highest of 92 not out, an average of 47.80 and a strike rate of 159.
While Samson’s 92* won Rajasthan Royals the match, Pant’s 85 ended up on the losing side, overshadowed by AB de Villiers’ 90*.
Having played for India has ensured we no longer look at Rishabh’s U-19 cricket anymore. Or for that matter, his spectacular First Class and List A numbers. His strike rates of 99.36 (FC), 104.68 (L.A) and 163.11 (T20) are no more the pointers for India selection – his IPL numbers however, very much are.
More so, as Saha is the man for Tests, and Dhoni is the one-day master. Any vacancy that opens will be in the T20 side – maybe not even as a wicketkeeper batsman but as a batsman alone. Dinesh Karthik’s return, with a winning last ball six and ascendancy as KKR captain, makes it even trickier.
In his four T20s for India, Rishabh has been a fraction of the player he is for Delhi or Delhi Daredevils – 5*(11), 38(35), 23(23), 7(8). He’s batted twice at No. 3 and 5 and once at six.
In this IPL so far, Rishabh has stepped up – his scoring shots and areas are far more; there’s an elimination of risks early on, starting with singles, twos; the boundaries are on the ground, often swept, a shot not many Indian batsmen play.
There’s an improved knowledge of his own game, that he can win the Delhi Daredevils games single handedly – that he, lofty as it may sound, is their best batsman. That Gambhir and not him is the captain, is a blessing.
More so, as he was sacked from captaincy within a week of leading the Delhi state team to the Ranji Trophy final.
“I want to focus more on my game. I want to contribute more to my team, I can do all these things without being captain. In my state, we have senior players like Ishant (Sharma) bhaiyya and Gauti bhaiyya. They are there to do captaincy, I don’t think I’m needed for this task at this moment.” – (as told to The Indian Express)
With Gambhir’s scratchy form, and Rishab’s increased batting influence, it’s uncertain how long he’ll be able to shy away from greater responsibility.
In the match against RCB, Rishabh’s seven 6s had Virat Kohli zapped – it wasn’t so much as the number, as the certainty and execution of those hits. They were brutal. Definite. Almost ruthless, often down the ground, far and wide into the night sky.
Six days before, however, Samson had tonked Kohli’s men for 10 6’s. We all know how that game ended.
After losing all over the country, the Daredevils come home to the Feroz Shah Kotla. Can Rishabh convert his knowledge of the Kotla into match winning innings – those that will help the Indian selectors not forget his name?
As it is, with Gayle, Russell and Narine, the West Indian cricketers are on a roll. Can Rishabh unleash some of his own Caribbean magic – it’s hip over square leg. Bring it on, boy. As with Samson, the magic is in the here. And now.
(Aside: In that U-19 game, just about every Indian bowled. Rishabh Pant turned his arm over with some leg spin. Much like my seven-year-old friend, Rishabh Khaund, who swears by leg spin. And only recently gave us a demonstration of his leg breaks and googlies in the living room)

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